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Community speed watch

One of the most recent developments within the Safer Roads Partnership's enforcement strategy is the introduction of the Community Speed Watch (CSW) scheme within Herefordshire, Shropshire, Telford & Wrekin, Warwickshire and Worcestershire.

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Community Speed Watch schemes are coordinated by the Safer Roads team but managed and run by volunteers in the community. The scheme enables local people to take an active role in road safety and make their community safer.

The aim of CSW is NOT to catch as many speeding drivers as possible. It aims to encourage motorists to drive at a safe and appropriate speed, reduce speed in areas on concern, re-educate drivers about the dangers of speeding and address concerns from local residents about vehicles speeding through their neighbourhood.

How does CSW work?

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At specified safe locations, volunteers monitor the speed of passing vehicles with a hand-held speed detection device. Offending vehicles' details are recorded on a log sheet and warning letters are sent to the registered keepers with advice on safer driving.

Schemes are evaluated to ensure they are having a positive impact on vehicle speed, driver behaviour and community reassurance.

Which communities can have a CSW scheme?

There are a number of criteria which must be met before a scheme will be established:

  • Speeding must have been identified as a PACT or Community Forum priority.
  • Active speed enforcement operations must not already be underway in the area by Warwickshire Police, West Mercia Police or the Safer Roads Partnership.
  • There must be at least six volunteers in each CSW scheme.
  • Speed checks must be conducted by at least three volunteers.
  • The area must have a 30 or 40 mph speed restriction.

Can anyone become a CSW volunteer?

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Volunteers must be aged 18 or over, and will only be accepted onto a scheme once appropriate checks have been carried out. Volunteers must be able to make a regular commitment to carry out activity and must adhere to the scheme's safety rules at all times.

Training will be provided covering areas such as health and safety, legislation and how to use the speed detection equipment.

Local groups are supported by the police provided they comply with clear guidelines in the Community Speed Watch policy, to assist in the delivery of a structured, safe scheme.

Want to get involved?

If you have concerns about speeding traffic in your local area, please visit the How to raise concerns about speeding page.